Funding Opportunities

Funding Opportunities

Jewish EdTech offers funders several avenues of engagement:

  • Ecosystem strategies which seek to bolster the underlying infrastructure and increase the absorptive capacity for supplementary funding, thereby benefitting the sector as a whole.
  • Strategies which focus on a single area within the education continuum, such as content creation or content distribution channels.
  • “Peanut butter strategies” which seek to spread investment around without being constrained by specific strategic intent.

In each case, investing in EdTech can reasonably be integrated into existing funding areas, such as day schools, college students, unaffiliated, etc.  But since technology is by its nature disruptive, EdTech does not always adhere to the traditional categories to which funders are accustomed.

For this reason, it is useful to contextualize the 3 dimensions through which Jewish EdTech can be viewed:

  1. Channels
  2. Segments
  3. Educational Continuum

The diagram above proposes a variety of strategies that funders can employ in order to leverage their giving meaningfully. An example of this is funding online content distribution infrastructure, which serves all segments. If specific areas are neglected, on the other hand (for example, if quality assurance in implementation support is neglected), funders would have no way of assessing the impact of their investments in content.

To sum up: effective funding means acknowledging that Jewish EdTech couldn’t be more relevant as a as a catalyst for change which at the same time involves unique complexities which must be addressed.

Day Schools

Technology plays a critical role in a progressive 21st century education. Funding technology in day schools can therefore have one of the biggest impacts in strengthening student learning and preparation for “real world” applications of their studies. Technology in schools has the potential to boost student capacity for growth by offering new creative outlets for learning that answer to different learning styles. Access to Internet resources has the benefit of making information limitless and learning more flexible. Interactive tools such as Smart Boards (digital whiteboards), iPads, and Chromebooks can engage students through programs that intertwine education with entertainment. With standardized testing moving online, classroom access to computers and typing skills is critical in preparing students for state tests. While the overriding learning targets of day schools are consistent overall with those from before the technological boom of our generation, the ubiquitous nature of technology in today’s society makes it crucial to ensure that day school students develop the digital literacy they need to succeed. By integrating use of technology in day school education, students will gain the practical knowledge necessary for success in the 21st century, regardless of their home access to these tools (or lack thereof).

In order to effectively fund EdTech and ensure success in implementation, the plan of action must go beyond mere purchasing of materials. This means that beyond choosing content (ie, the specific technology being funded), it is important to consider how the technology will be distributed amongst the teachers and students of the day school, what sort of training teachers might need to successfully integrate the new tool into their instruction practices, and how the impact and success of the technology will be assessed. If you are interested in funding integration of technology in day schools, it is important to consider these complexities involved.

Supplementary Schools

While supplementary schools function to complement primary educative settings, the material of study is equally important in gearing learners towards success. For this reason, the integration and implementation of technological tools is similarly critical in supplementary schools to maximize student learning. The same tools that teachers seek for their classrooms to enhance student learning in day schools can and should be integrated into supplementary school environments for the same benefits of increasing student engagement, addressing various learning styles, expanding the boundaries of exploration, and offering practical preparation to students in a technology-infused world which necessitates a certain degree of digital literacy for success.

In order to effectively fund EdTech and ensure success in implementation, the plan of action must go beyond mere purchasing of materials. This means that beyond choosing content (ie, the specific technology being funded), it is important to consider how the technology will be distributed amongst the teachers and students of the supplementary schools, what sort of training teachers might need to successfully integrate the new tool into their instruction practices, and how the impact and success of the technology will be assessed. If you are interested in funding integration of technology in supplementary schools, it is important to consider these complexities involved.

College

Within a post-secondary, collegiate, and post-collegiate setting, the main goal is above all preparing students for real-world success. It is therefore necessary to mirror a real-world environment in these settings, which in today’s world is centered around the integration of technology into numerous aspects of both personal and professional life. Beyond strengthening engagement and preparing students with the digital literacy they need, technology is also important for facilitating outreach. In many cases, these educative settings serve a large population of students under a comparably smaller population of educators. In these circumstances of large classroom environments, technological tools (such as, for example, online platforms and/or large hall projectors / microphones) are instrumental in helping educators reach their students and teach them the skills they need for success. All in all, a collegiate environment without EdTech in the 21st century would suffer in their ability to serve their students in preparing them for what lies ahead.

In order to effectively fund EdTech and ensure success in implementation, the plan of action must go beyond mere purchasing of materials. This means that beyond choosing content (ie, the specific technology being funded), it is important to consider how the technology will be distributed amongst the educators and students of the collegiate school settings, what sort of training educators and students might need to successfully integrate the new tool into their instruction practices, and how the impact and success of the technology will be assessed. If you are interested in funding integration of technology in collegiate school settings, it is important to consider these complexities involved.

Unaffiliated

Gaining an education does not always mean going through an affiliated institution officially attached or connected to a group or organization. There are numerous avenues of learning which are considered unaffiliated, but which uphold the standards of education and goals of contributing to the success of learners. This includes, for example, tutoring centers, study groups, book clubs and more. This kind of unaffiliated learning utilized by nearly all populations reaps numerous benefits from educational technologies. Beyond engaging learners in the acquisition of knowledge, EdTech can provide unaffiliated learners with access to educational platforms which enhance learning by increasing the quantity and quality of the information they are exposed to and extending their resource bank to promote limitless access to the knowledge their seek.

In order to effectively fund EdTech and ensure success in implementation, the plan of action must go beyond mere funding of content. This means that beyond choosing content (ie, the specific technology being funded), it is important to consider how the technology will be accessed, what sort of training might be necessary to successfully integrate this new tool, and how the impact and success of the technology will be assessed. If you are interested in funding integration of technology that fosters learning for all populations regardless of official affiliation, it is important to consider these complexities involved.

Parents

As a parent, one of the most important ways to connect to your child’s education is through communication with their educators and school environment. This means open dialogue with their teacher as well as access to their curriculum plan, learning targets, and assessment grades. With the increase of technology in the education sector has come a boost in technological tools that connect parents to their child’s education. Tools of this nature range from mobile applications which offer safe chat tools to facilitate parent communication with teachers, to online platforms which can record and share measurements of success for parent’s to keep up to date with their child’s performance. In this way, parents can play active role in their child’s education and school experience.

In order to effectively fund EdTech and ensure success in implementation, the plan of action must go beyond mere purchasing of materials. This means that beyond choosing content (ie, the specific technology being funded), it is important to consider how the technology will be distributed amongst the parents, teachers and students, what sort of training might be necessary to successfully integrate this new tool, and how the impact and success of the technology will be assessed. If you are interested in funding integration of technology that fosters parent involvement in their child’s journey in education, it is important to consider these complexities involved.

Learn with JEDTech

Lifelong learners

It could be argued that lifelong learners gain perhaps the largest benefit from educational technologies. Before EdTech, continuing education was largely dependent upon access to academic institutions to provide you with the resources needed to facilitate learning. Today, with the advancements in EdTech comes a treasure chest of resources for lifelong learners to access from wherever, whenever. Through the use of online platforms, mobile applications, video technologies, and tablets which simplify access to reading and research materials, lifelong learners can access a virtual bank of knowledge waiting to be grasped. All a person needs to be a student in today’s technologically-infused world is the desire to learn! Funding EdTech that helps disseminate information and knowledge about a topic of interest is therefore incredibly impactful in making learning accessible for everyone, both in and outside a traditional learning institution or academic setting. 

In order to effectively fund EdTech and ensure success in implementation, the plan of action must go beyond mere purchasing of content. This means that beyond choosing content (ie, the specific technology being funded), it is important to consider how the technology will be accessed by virtual learners, what might go into teaching users to successfully navigate this tool, and how the impact and success of the technology will be assessed. If you are interested in funding integration of technology that fosters lifelong learning, it is important to consider these complexities involved.

Make a Difference and Contribute to the World of Jewish EdTech

As a potential funder looking to make an investment that contributes to the rapid growth of educational technologies within Jewish education initiatives, it is important to understand the various details involved in making successful investments with maximum impact.

Explore the following pages to learn more about integral elements to becoming an investor in educational innovation.

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